4 A.M. or Later

dropdeadesu:

A friend of mine just messaged me saying “I fucked up. I was doing math with my son, and I told him to ‘hold up eleven fingers’ and he started to panic and I didn’t realize why until he screamed ‘MOM…MOM I ONLY HAVE TEN”

natsura:

so i finally received my transistor usb today and

Jedi: May the force be with you
Catholic Jedi: And also with you

hbreckel:

I’ve been to a ton of cons this year both as a fan and as a panelist, and because I see a lot of the same things happening at panels I thought this might be of help to both new and old con attendees. This is specifically for Q&As but can be applied to normal panels too.

If you’re going to…

I always have the hardest time finding these posts for some reason — asking a good question at a panel is much harder than most people realize!

About the only thing I’d add to this ties into the “being respectful of others wanting to ask questions point”, because you’ll always get those “questions” that take over a minute to actually ask something because the asker is so busy rambling at the mike about their life’s story or God knows what. We’ve all cringed at those kinds of monologues, so try not to author one yourself…

Reblog if you love to write.

Whether it be fanfiction, original stories, drabbles, songs, poems, books, or anything that has to do with creative words, then reblog. Let’s gather all the writers of Tumblr together.

theoriginalspike:

andro-saurus:

violentxfemmes:

kirkwa:

And This Is Why You Shouldn’t Get Sick In America

Many believe that the US healthcare system is the best in the world. Not so according to the World Health Organization’s ranking of the world’s health systems. The US doesn’t even rank in the top 25. It ranks 37th and is the most expensive in the world. I would argue that even if we had the best healthcare system in the world, what good is it, if no one can afford to access it.

Most companies are buying 60/40-policys for their employees these days, but even if you are lucky enough to have good insurance with 80/20-policy coverage, that 20 percent your responsible for can drive you right into bankruptcy as easily as the 60-40 policy given the cost of healthcare.

Insurance cost have been going up dramatically in the last two decades, long before the new Affordable Healthcare Act has taken affect, in some cases as much as 35% per year.

But have you noticed the latest trick the insurance companies have roll out?

Yes, Higher Deductible… most averaging $5,000 per year, per person, but I have seen some as high as $10,000 per year. For those of you that are wondering, this tactic is specifically designed too stop you from using your insurance. It reduces the insurance companies out of pocket liability by shift costs onto consumers, especially those dealing with chronic illness such as diabetes and arthritis. Consequently, because consumers can’t afford the deductible they will avoid necessary care to save money.

Although insurance companies are a problem, the real crocks is the healthcare system it self. A corrupt and bloated system desperately in need of reform!

This is absolutely ridiculous.

I live in New Zealand. My mum had a heart attack when I was 13, she was in hospital for at least 3 months and our government pays for most of our bills so I think my parents only had to pay around about $500 - 1k. With the option to pay it over a period of time.

Like????? Does the America government even give the slightest fuck about the people that live in their country???? Honestly.

No. They don’t.

They don’t because the SECOND someone tries to change the healthcare system, all the old conservative as fuck white men in congress pitch a goddamn fit.

Adding to the problem is that your average American has no idea how they get billed for their medical care, either. What I’m about to say here isn’t going to help those folks charged $700 for a couple of pills with insurance coverage, but I’m hoping I can help you understand why they were charged that way, politics-free.

First off! Save the ED trips for true life-threatening emergencies — major trauma, chest pains, suicidal thoughts — anything that cannot and should not wait for medical intervention. ED resources are expensive because you’ll use the same bed for nausea as another person would for heart complications. The both of you will be billed the same for it — that is to say, for all the freaking money.

If you break an ankle or spill boiling water on your arm, your better bet is to visit an urgent care center instead. You lose the convenience of 24-hour access, but resources at those facilities cost less to utilize and they take insurance coverages as well.

Now — medical billing in America is split into two different categories: technical charges describe the facilities, supplies, procedures, and drugs you use up during your episode of care, while professional charges describe services rendered from a doctor’s experience and expertise. Technical charges are far and away the larger part of a guarantor’s balance (a guarantor being anyone responsible for paying for the patient’s care), and you can see in the pictures above how they can stack up over even a very short inpatient stay.

But! There’s often a huge difference between the billed charges you see in those pictures versus the patient responsibility, which is often a lesser amount. The pictures above are misleading, as we’re seeing a lot of the former when the latter is (accidentally or intentionally) cropped out.

(Yeah, I know paying $20,000 is no great comfort over paying $150,000. That’s still just… bad.)

Why are we charging $60 for a goddamn Tylenol, anyway? Well, hospitals negotiate contracts with insurance companies that specify how services get reimbursed, and in 99% of those contracts the insurance company will only allow a percentage of that charge to be paid. So if the allowed percentage of a charge is 5% of what the hospital bills, the hospital must write off the remaining 95% — it is not allowed to bill the patient that remainder. These adjustments happen all the time, which is why a $40 room stay in Canada can be billed for $1200 in America and yet receive the same amount of money.

So! When the balance shifts to you, the patient, regardless of your insurance coverage or lack of it, you really shouldn’t see yourself responsible for paying 100% of the hospital’s billed charges! If you do, call the hospital right away and ask for a customer service representative. Billing mistakes happen.

If your responsibility is legitimate, then you may qualify for self-pay discounts depending on your annual income — many facilities discount or even waive your responsibility entirely if you only make a certain percentage of the Federal Poverty Level. Otherwise, look to see if you can qualify for your state’s Medicaid or Medicare programs, or for any charity care programs the hospital may offer. Worst comes to worst, visit a health insurance exchange to explore your private insurance options, and ask if you can arrange a payment plan.

TL;DR: Billed charges aren’t actually what you think the patient owes! American healthcare is still expensive as fuck, but you’re almost never paying what you see up there.

Source: this was my job for the past nine months.

heysawbones:

isthistakenalready:

Aoi Honoo is Too Real

fuck I feel you

90% of conversations with me
me: who is that
me: what are you talking about
me: I don't know what that is
me: wait what

a-world-with-octobers:

angelophile:

Katniss Everdeen photographed by starrfallphotography on Deviantart.

Cosplay by Aspen of White Rabbit Cosplay and Photography.

This is what Katniss should have looked like tbh

rarijackdaily:

Is there somepony out there?
http://fav.me/d7x8gip

YES. GOOD.

rarijackdaily:

Is there somepony out there?

http://fav.me/d7x8gip

YES. GOOD.